An Introduction to the Design of Small-Scale Embedded Systems

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This page carries further information on the book. It  includes new and supporting information, links to useful sites, and errata.

Lecturer support, including a solutions manual to end-of-chapter problems, can be obtained by recommending lecturers from the publishers. The full contents listing, and Chapter 1, can also be viewed in PDF format.

About the Book
The book aims to be an accessible account of embedded systems, targeted at students of electronics and mechatronics, and also practitioners in the field. Starting with its first example, a jet-powered cycle, and moving on to such headings as Interrupts without Tears, and Taming the Flow Diagram, it aims to be readable, yet  rigorous. Most example in the book are based on Microchip 16 series ("mid-range") PIC microcontrollers. 8051 and 68HC05/08 devices are also considered, leading to a wide ranging grasp of microcontroller capability.


Why I Wrote the Book
The book arises from years of varied design and teaching experience. Many of the Final Year Projects which I supervised at Cambridge University caused the same questions to be asked, and it was these frequently asked questions which were one of the reasons for writing. Involvement in the celebrated Integrated Design Project at Cambridge inspired the chapter on Design methods. 


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Universities Recommending this Book
These are examples of Universities who recommend this book

University of Reading, UK. Course EE2A2: Embedded Microprocessor Systems

University of Essex, UK. Course EE107-1-AS: Digital and Computer Systems

University of Uppsala, Sweden Course: Mät- och Mikrodatorteknik

University of Aston, UK Course EE2PES Programmable Electronic Systems

Yuan-Ze University, Taiwan. Course: ME 338: Fundamental and Applications of Microcomputers


Supporting Information, by Chapter
Note: All the links included in end-of-chapter references are included below. Many of them also appear in the links to Semiconductor Manufacturers on the main site.

Chapter 1: Introducing Embedded Systems, and the Microcontroller
Chapter 2: From Humble Beginnings - Towards the Minimum System 
Chapter 3: Preliminary Programming
   
Chapter 4: Memory Matters       
Chapter 5: Analogue Affairs        
Chapter 6: Strictly Serial       
Chapter 7: Systematic Software      
Chapter 8: Dealing with Time      
Chapter 9: Interfacing to External Devices      
Chapter 10: Supplying and Using Power, in a Power Conscious World
Chapter 11: Dealing with Numbers
Chapter 12: Designing and Commissioning the System

Chapter 1: Introducing Embedded Systems, and the Microcontroller

http://www.workingtechnologies.com/htpic/ Good site for further PIC links

End of Chapter Reference Links
www.microchip.com
 
www.philips.semiconductors.com/mcu/products/
http://e-www/motorola.com/index.html

Chapter 2: From Humble Beginnings - Towards the Minimum System

Errata

Page 32, penultimate line, reference should be to Chapter 3, not 4.

Page 46, Worked Example 2. Final line should lead to value for R2 of 193 ohms (Value of 10mA applied in calculation instead of 14mA).

If you're wanting to do pcb layout with a low-cost design package, consider the offerings of http://www.niche.co.uk/   

Chapter 3: Preliminary Programming
A popular and low-cost PIC programmer is the P16PRO. Information appears on many web sites, including:
http://www.dontronics.com

Pictured alongside is an "electronic pingpong", developed as an example answer to Question 3.15b) of this Chapter. We use this at Derby as a case study to launch our Embedded Systems module. Full design and programme listing will be posted, otherwise email me.  

 

Chapter 4: Memory Matters

Errata
Question 4.2b), Page 125, should read "A memory contains 262 144 bits..."

End of Chapter Reference Links:
Microchip Technology

Advanced Micro Devices

Hitachi Semiconductors

Xicor Inc

Atmel

 

Chapter 5: Analogue Affairs

Errata

Worked Example 5.5: Capacitor in Fig. 5.13 should be labelled 10nF


Chapter 6: Strictly Serial

Errata
Page 174, line 14, new sentence should read "Some (like RS 232) are specific about...


Chapter 7: Systematic Software

Further Bibliography
Ted van Sickle. Programming Microcontrollers in C. LLH Technology Publishing. ISBN 1-878707-57-4.
Les Hatton. Safer C. McGraw Hill. ISBN 0-07-707640-0.
Peter van der Linden. Expert C Programming. Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-177429-8.

End of Chapter Reference Links
:
Pacific C

Firmware Standards Manual (Ganssle)


Chapter 8: Dealing with Time


 In January 2002 Electronics World published "a Multitasking Metronome", pictured
alongside, which is a complete solution to question 8.7 of Chapter 8.

 

 

 

 

Real Time Operating Systems
A number of interesting RTOS's, targeted to the small-scale end of the market, are available. The following sites are interesting:

www.livedevices.com (look for "Real Time Architect")
www.rtxc.com 
www.metrowerks.com (look for "OSEK Turbo" RTOS)
http://www.pumpkininc.com/ Describes Salvo™, a Real-Time Operating System designed expressly for very-low-cost embedded systems with severely limited ROM and RAM. Currently for use with:

 

Chapter 9: Interfacing to External Devices

Errata
Page 265, line 13. New sentence should read: "A square wave is applied as shown; when the control input is low, square waves of opposite phase are applied to the cell and it is activated. With the control input high, the same square wave...."
Page 283, 10th line from bottom, sentence could read: "If the phases are energised in turn, the rotor will turn, with a step length of 90o." The step length will actually depend on drive waveform, not specified in this sentence. If it is the simplest pattern, i.e. of Fig 9.30a), then the revised statement here is correct.

End of Chapter Reference Links:
Hitachi Semiconductors (now Renesas)
Airpax Mechatronics


Chapter 10: Supplying and Using Power, in a Power Conscious World

Errata
In the Table on p.312 the results for 3V and 6V conditions are reversed.

End of Chapter Reference Links:
Maxim


Chapter 11: Dealing with Numbers

Errata
Page 327, Fig.11.3, the multiplier is 5D, and the multiplicand is 3D, i.e. they are reverse labelled.


Chapter 12: Designing and Commissioning the System

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